The Daffodils by William Wordsworth – Summary

The Daffodils by William Wordsworth

Stanza by stanza summary

William Wordsworth was an avid observer of nature. In this poem, he describes the impression a cluster of daffodil flowers created in his mind when he saw them while taking a stroll beside a lake hemmed by some trees.

Stanza 1 ..

The beauty of the daffodils lifted his mind and his spirit. His imagination and his poetic instincts came to the fore. He could see himself as a cloud floating past the golden-coloured daffodils on the ground where some trees stood beside a lake. The flowers were swaying in the breeze. This gentle movement enhanced their attraction.

Stanza 2..

The daffodils were numerous in number. They seemed to stretch in an endless line. The poet felt as if they were like the twinkling stars in the Milky Way. Clearly, the poet has been profoundly enchanted by the daffodils’ beauty, accentuated by their alternating swaying movements. The flowers, appearing full of life and beauty, have un-fettered the poetic imagination of Wordsworth.

Stanza 3..

The waves in the lake swayed too, pushed by the breeze. But the beauty of the daffodils was far more enchanting than that of the waves. The poet could not take his eyes off the golden daffodils. He remained enthralled by their beauty. He began to wonder what a great bounty of nature he had stumbled upon.

Stanza 4..

This pleasant encounter with the daffodils by the lake remained dormant in the poet’s sub-conscious mind. When he was lonely or his spirits were low, the memory of his encounter with the daffodils would surface, plunging his mind with immense pleasure. Thus, the scene remained as a priceless treasure and an in-exhaustible source of joy for the poet.

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